Tuesday, March 20, 2018

The Name Is Austin: Beware Texas and Maryland

On March 20, 2018, news concentrated on two fronts tied to the name Austin in Texas and Maryland.

The name Austin is an English name. Austin was developed in the Middle Ages from the Latin Augustine, meaning magic dignity, or venerable

Austin Bombings Continue: FedEx Certainly, Goodwill Maybe

From March 2 through March 18, 2018, four package explosions have occurred in Austin, Texas, resulting in two deaths. (See details here.)

The earlier deaths of two men named House (March 2) and Mason (March 12) were from families who knew each other, and involved in community organizing.

The location of the Dawn Song Drive explosion was near the home of a Latina activist.

From the New York Times: "Eliza May said she was watching a TV show in her home when she heard what sounded like a transformer blowing up in her backyard. 'It sounded like when the transformers go out, but it was five times magnified that,' said Ms. May, who lives about 200 feet from where the explosion was said to have occurred."

Bomb #5

On March 20, during the hour after midnight, a package exploded on a conveyor belt at a FedEx shipping center at Schertz, near San Antonio, Texas. One employee was injured. 

Bomb #6

Hours after the San Antonio blast, police sent a bomb squad to a FedEx facility outside Austin's main airport to check on a suspicious package that was reported shortly before sunrise. Authorities roped off a large area around the shopping center in the enclave of Sunset Valley.

The ATF Houston tweeted that the "two packages located at two separate FedEx facilities in Austin/San Antonio are on 3/20/2018 are connected to the four previous package explosions that occurred between 3/2 and 3/18 in Austin, TX."

Device #7

Around 7:00 pm, an incendiary device exploded, injuring one male, at a Goodwill Store in south Austin, on Brodie Lane, near Slaughter. 

The police appear to be downplaying this incident, and some authorities are saying it was unrelated to the previous bombings.

School Shooting

A gunman who opened fire on students at Great Mills High School in Maryland was killed on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, after engaging an armed school resource officer.

The shooter, Austin Wyatt Rollins, 17, was the only fatality. Police said Rollins used a handgun to shoot a 16-year-old female student, who was identified by family members as Jaelynn Willey. She remains in the ICU with life-threatening, critical injuries. A 14-year-old male was also shot by Rollins or the school resource officer, and is in stable condition.

The school's resource officer, Deputy Blaine Gaskill, was alerted of the shooting, immediately responded, and killed Austin Wyatt Rollins.

Great Mills High School is a comprehensive public high school of 1600+ students in grades 9-12. Great Mills High School was founded in 1929, as one of the original high schools in St. Mary's County, Maryland. It serves students at the confluence of the Potomac River, Patuxent River, and Chesapeake Bay. The ethnic population of the school reflects the community: 51% Caucasian, 40% African American, 5% Asian, 4% Hispanic, 1% other. At Great Mills High School, student athletes are known as the Hornets.

h/t SHunter, SMiles, NVoid

Monday, March 19, 2018

Dawn Song Drive: Austin Bomb Blast #4

Emergency crews in Austin, Texas, responded to a explosion Sunday night, March 18, 2018, which happened in the southwest part of the city. Austin Police said two men were transported to the hospital with serious injuries, but they are not expected to be life-threatening.

The explosion occurred in the 4800 block of Dawn Song Drive. (Dawn = Aurora.) First reported to be at 4721 Eagle Feather Drive (but that was incorrect).

Device may have been by the side of a road, set off by a trip wire. Victims appear to be on or pushing bikes.

One man is reported to have nails in his leg.

The latest blast occurred around 8:30 p.m. Sunday, March 18, 2018, in a suburban neighborhood known as Travis Country in southwest Austin — far from the previous three that were all in residential areas in the eastern part of the city — and investigators didn't immediately confirm what caused it. But Austin Police Chief Brian Manley repeated previously issued warnings for residents not to touch any unexpected packages left at their homes.

Two men in their 20s were hurt in the latest blast. Police said they were hospitalized with injuries that weren't life-threatening. They are said to be white, Caucasian, and thus, temporarily undermining the theory the previous three bombings were racially motivated.

Sunday, March 18, 2018, is the final day of the South By Southwest music festival, which draws hundreds of thousands to Austin every March. It is also the end of spring break for many area school districts, meaning families who were out of town in recent days are returning to a city increasingly on edge.

The explosions occurred far from the main South By Southwest activities, though a downtown concert by hip-hop band The Roots was canceled Saturday night after a bomb threat. Authorities later arrested a 26-year-old man, and the incident did not appear to be related to any previous explosions.

Bombings #1, #2, and #3

It was the fourth explosion to rock Austin in less than three weeks.

The first was a package bomb that exploded at a northeast Austin home on Haverford Drive, on March 2, 2018, killing a 39-year-old man. Two more package bombs then exploded farther south on March 12, killing a 17-year-old, wounding his mother and injuring a 75-year-old woman.

Police said all three of those were likely related and involved packages that had not been mailed or delivered by private carrier but left overnight on doorsteps. Austin police originally suggested they could have been hate crimes since all the victims were black or Hispanic, but now investigators aren't ruling out any possible motive.

Austin's earlier explosions were in the 4800 block of Oldfort Hill Drive and in the 6700 block of Galindo Street.

The Galindo incident happened hours after police responded to a previous package explosion at the 4800 block of Oldfort Hill Drive, killing a teenager and injuring a woman, police have said. LaVonne Mason, co-founder of the Austin Area Urban League, told the Post her grandson was the 17-year-old victim killed Monday morning.

A 17-year-old victim in a series of deadly package bombs delivered to homes in Austin, Texas, has been identified as Draylen Mason, while a law enforcement source revealed the same maker may have constructed the three devices.

Draylen Mason.

Described by Austin's police chief as an "outstanding young man who was going places with his life," Mason was killed Monday morning, March 12, 2018, when a package exploded in the kitchen of his Austin home as it was being opened. His mother is in stable condition.

Three package bombs exploded at homes in the Texas capital over 10 days -- one on March 2 and two on March 12 -- killing two people and injuring two others. Investigators have said they believe the attacks are related.

In all three bombings, residents found the cardboard packages outside their houses. Two exploded as they were being handled outside, police said.

But the package that exploded indoors yielded parts that could be reconstructed, a law enforcement source told CNN on condition of anonymity. The devices were essentially pipe bombs rigged to explode upon opening, the source said.

Anthony Stephan House, the Austin bomber's first victim

The stepfather of man who died in a package explosion in Austin earlier this month knew the grandfather of one of the victims in Monday’s first bombing, according to the Washington Post.

Fredie Dixon’s stepson, Anthony Stephan House, 39, died after a package exploded at his house on March 2, 2018. Dixon told the Post he is good friends with Norman Mason, the grandfather of the teenager who was killed in a package explosion around 6:45 a.m. March 12, 2018, in the 4800 block of Oldfort Hill Drive.

“This is a real mystery, and how all of this mystery comes together, I have no idea,” Dixon told the Post. Source.

A Name Game?

The names of Mason and House - and even Oldfort Hill, now Dawn Song are all highly symbolic.

One meaning of Galindo, which is in essence a personal name, is "foreigner or stranger."

Sibyl Hunter adds:
“The stone the builders rejected has become the capstone" (Psalm 118:22).
The image comes from the ancient quarries where highly-trained stoneMASONs carefully chose the stones used in construction. No stone was more important than the cornerstone because the integrity of the whole structure depended on the cornerstone containing exactly the right lines. If the cornerstone was not exactly right, the entire building would be out of line. For that reason, builders inspected many stones, rejecting each one until they found the one they wanted. Rejected stones might be used in other parts of the building, but they would never become the cornerstone or the capstone (the first and last stones put in place).
"Everyone then who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who built his HOUSE on the rock. 25 And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on the rock. 26 And everyone who hears these words of mine and does not do them will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand. 27 And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell, and great was the fall of it." (Matt 7:24-27)
The Date?

On March 18, 1314, Jacques de Molay, the 23rd and final Grand Master of the Knights Templar, is burned at the stake.

Killing at Temple Mount

Attack from Dawn Star, March 18, 2018: Lawrence passed along this news.
An Israeli security guard was killed by an assailant armed with a knife on Sunday 18th March 2018, near the entrance to Lion's Gate in Jerusalem's Old City. He was initially seriously wounded, but later died. (Source.) 
The guard (Adiel Kolman, a married father of four) was from the West Bank settlement of 'Kochav Shachar'. The meaning in English is 'Dawn Star'. 'Shachar' means 'dawn' ('kochav' means 'star'). I sometimes see this place name sloppily misspelt/mispronounced in English as 'shahar' (including in that specific Jerusalem Post article, of all places. Usually the JPost gets it right), but it's 'shachar'. Sometimes 'kochav shachar' is translated as 'morning star', but it is literally 'dawn star'.

Lion's Gate in Jerusalem has its own mythic and political resonances of course. The entrance leads to the Via Dolorosa. The Wikipedia entry for Lion's Gate informs us: "Near the gate’s crest are four figures of leopards, often mistaken for lions, two on the left and two on the right. They were placed there by Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent to celebrate the Ottoman defeat of the Mamluks in 1517."
Israeli paratroopers famously stormed through this gate during the Six-Day War of 1967 to conquer the Temple Mount (from Jordan), after which they unfurled the Israeli flag above the Old City.

Historian Moshe Sharon notes the similarity of the sculpted lions to similar pairs at Jisr Jindas and Qasr al-Basha in Gaza. All represent the same Sultan: Baybars. Sharon estimates that they all date to approximately 1273 C.E.

Saturday, March 03, 2018

White House Suicide

A man shot himself and died in front of the White House, near the north fence, on Saturday, March 3, 2018. This would be between the White House and Lafayette Park. (See "Fayette Factor.")

Andrew Jackson statue and canons at Lafayette Park, Washington D.C.

Suicide 2018

"Secret Service personnel are responding to reports of a person who allegedly suffered a self-inflicted gun shot wound along the north fence line of @WhiteHouse," the Secret Service tweeted.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump are at Mar-a-Lago in Florida. They are scheduled to return to Washington on Saturday night for the annual Gridiron Club Dinner.

"We are aware of the incident," deputy press secretary Hogan Gidley said. "The President has been briefed. I refer you to the Secret Service for any more information."

The Secret Service tweeted an update on the situation later: "No other reported injuries related to the incident at @WhiteHouse."

The suicide victim's car, a maroon four-door Honda, with an Alabama plate, 1285AL9, was found on K Street, examined, and then towed away by Secret Service.

The Individual

Is this Cameron Ross Burgess?

Late on Sunday, March 4, 2018, the man who died by suicide was identified. His name is Cameron Ross Burgess, 26. He was a 2013 graduate of Auburn University, in finance. Above is his apparent Facebook photo.

He was from Maylene, Alabama. Maylene is an unincorporated community in Shelby County, Alabama, United States. While the community was once unincorporated, it is now part of southern Alabaster. Maylene has a post office with ZIP code 35114.

Shelby is one of those hidden name games, not often discussed, but always in the background. The name "Shelby" means "willow grove," "a place where willows grow," and "willow farm." I wrote the essay, "Shelby Name Game," in 2015. See also, "Synchromysticism's Godfather," from 2008, about James Shelby Downard.

Cameron Ross Burgess' name means:

Cameron is a given name in the English language. In the Scottish Highlands the surname is thought to be derived from the Gaelic cam sròn, meaning "crooked nose" or "crooked river"; in the Scottish Lowlands the name is thought to be derived from a form of Norman baronial name—from Cambernon, in Normandy.
Ross is from a Scottish and English surname which originally indicated a person from a place called Ross (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), derived from Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland."

Burgess is English and Scottish, being a status name from Middle English burge(i)s, Old French burgeis "inhabitant and (usually) freeman of a (fortified) town," especially one with municipal rights and duties. Burgesses generally had tenure of land or buildings from a landlord by burgage.

Was Suicide Predicted?

Did the mysterious Twitter poster QAnon (@qanon76) predict the suicide?

In late October, just days before a different InfoWars-inflated conspiracy—about anti-fascist protesters plotting a civil war—was about to fizzle, a user identified as Q on the imageboard website 4chan started posting vague, portentous messages related to an approaching “storm.” The user claimed to be a high-level government operative, and the folks on /pol/, a subsection of 4chan with a history of spreading fake news, took notice—with some even believing it was President Donald Trump himself who was posting the messages on 4chan and on a similar website, 8chan.
Today, #Qanon (meaning Q, anonymous), also known as #TheStorm, is the web's fastest-spreading and most pervasive right-wing conspiracy theory....Here’s what you need to know about the biggest fake news story of 2018. See the rest, by Michael Edison Hayden, "How 'The Storm' Became The Biggest Fake News Story of 2018," Newsweek, February 1, 2018.

On February 9, 2018, a Friday, the QAnon posted a cryptic note about a [Suicide Weekend]. The predicted time period appears to align with the Saturday, March 3, 2018, suicide.

Suicide 2015

The Washington D.C.'s U.S. Capitol reported on Saturday, April 11, 2015, at about 1:07, that Leo P. Thornton, 22, of Lincolnwood, Illinois, shot himself on the Capitol grounds and died. The suicide was a protest, and the Capitol Police would only say that the sign Thornton held pertained to "social justice." 

The site The Right Scoop noted Thornton was displaying a "Tax the One Percent" sign.


Friday, March 02, 2018

The New Children's Crusade

by Loren Coleman ©2018

A crusade is, simply put, something that's bigger than you are. It's a "cause" with an impact that reaches beyond your personal wants and needs.
 ~ Arthur L. Williams, Jr. (April 23, 1942 - )

After the Valentine's Day killing of 17 at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, a fundamental shift occurred in the mentality of America, regarding gun restrictions. It was driven by the adolescent students, first at Parkland, and then throughout the country. 

Despite a backlash from a few skeptical adults and a first wave of falsehoods about "crisis actors," thoughtful social media comments have been growing about youthful actions changing society.

Some examples from history have been shared:

Ages in 1776 
Marquis de Lafayette, 18 
James Monroe, 18 
Henry Lee III, 20 
John Trumbull, 20 
Aaron Burr, 20 
John Marshall, 20 
Nathan Hale, 21 
Alexander Hamilton, 21


Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1805-1806
Sacagawea, 17-18, became the expedition's interpreter/guide


Nat Turner, 22, began having the visions that lead to a slave rebellion.


Augustus Caesar was senator at 20.
Mary Shelly published Frankenstein at 20.
Galusha Pennypacker was a brigadier general at 20.
Alexander the Great conquered countries at 18.
Joan of Arc commanded an army at 17. 
Malala Yousafzai won the Nobel Peace Prize at 17.
Barbara Johns was 16 when she fought for better conditions in her segregated school.
Louis Braille invented Braille when he was 15. 
 Anne Frank's 14-year-old voice is an eternal reminder. 
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his first symphony at 8.

What do we know about past "Children's Crusades"?

The Original Children’s Crusade

The Children's Crusade for the Holy Land was organized in 1212. There were probably two separate movements of young people, both led by shepherd boys, neither of which eventually embarked from Europe, but both of which suffered considerable hardships and deaths:
 ~ Early spring 1212 – The child shepherd Nicholas leads a group numbering 7000, from the Rhineland to Genoa and Rome.
~ June 1212 – 12-year-old Stephen of Cloyes leads a group of 30,000, across France to Marseilles.
None of the children made it to the Holy Land.

Mother Jones' Children's Crusade

Mary Harris Jones' Children's Crusade, a cross-country march led by American labor organizer Mary Harris "Mother" Jones in 1903. Jones organized children who were working in mills and mines to participate in a Children's Crusade, a march from Kensington, Philadelphia to Oyster Bay, New York, the hometown of President Theodore Roosevelt with banners demanding "We want to go to school and not the mines!" Roosevelt never came out to meet them.

Civil Rights Children's Crusade

Children's Crusade (April 3-May 10, 1963), a march of over 1000 children led by James Bevel in Birmingham, Alabama, during the American Civil Rights Movement. The event resulted in outbreak of mass demonstrations throughout United States. It also had a call for March on Washington, Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, August 28, 1963. At the end of this March, Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his “I Have A Dream” speech. (See, "Children have changed America before, braving fire hoses and police dogs for civil rights," by Steven Levingston, Washington Post, February 22, 2018.)

One of the deadly reactions of the white supremacists (specifically the KKK) against the Birmingham Children's Crusade was the death of four young girls killed in the bombing of Birmingham's 16 Street Baptist Church on September 15, 1963 (clockwise from top left, Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson and Carol Denise McNair). Twenty-two others were injured. No prosecutions occurred until 1977, 2001, and 2002, of three of the four known bombers.

The Children's Crusade 2018

As many commentaries have noted, the reaction to the Parkland school shooting is turning out to be different than the aftermath of other recent shootings. Columbine occurred 19 years ago. High school survivors back then would be 33 to 38 years old today. The foundation has been set for social change. There are several reasons for why it happened at Parkland: Over a 1000 school shooting survivors exist in the US as of 2018; the survivors of the Las Vegas massacre were tourists who went home; the elementary student survivors of Sandy Hook were not an articulate force; and the older, near adult survivors at Parkland are media savvy.
The Parkland survivors are part of a much larger wave of youth activism that can be traced back to Black Lives Matter. There is undeniable racism in the fact that the majority white, well-to-do kids of Parkland have attracted broader public support than African-American protesters. Still, if we see Black Lives Matter and Parkland as part of a continuum, this suggests America might yet address seemingly intractable social problems like police brutality and mass shootings. A new generation is rejecting their elders’ complacency about these ills—and more of these youth reach voting age every day. ~ by Feet Heer, The New Republic, February 26, 2018.

There is a "New Children’s Crusade" that has developed from the 2018 Florida school shooting.

Thus far, besides individual and group media action, the student activists (with a core of them being journalism, media, political, and theater students) at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School have been involved in direct community organizing. They have planned these events:
February 21, 2018, Students’s March on the State Legislature, Tallahassee, Florida.
March 17, 2018, the first month anniversary of the Parkland shooting, may result in a localized walkout in Florida.
March 24, 2018 is the date of a planned "March for Our Lives" to Washington D.C. (March 24th is the 20th anniversary of when on March 24, 1998, two boys, aged 11 and 13, fire upon teachers and students at Westside Middle School in Jonesboro, Arkansas; five people are killed and ten are wounded. )
April 20, 2018 is designated as the day for the "National School Walkout." (April 20th is the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting of April 20, 1999. Two teen males killed 13 people and injured 24 others before dying by suicide in Columbine, Colorado.)

The student organization outfront about this is Never Again MSD (MSD refers to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School). This is an American student-led organization, which advocates for tighter regulations to prevent gun violence. The group, also known by the hashtag #NeverAgain, was formed in the aftermath of the shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in which 17 people were murdered by a shooter armed with an AR-15 style semi-automatic rifle. The group started on social media as a movement "For survivors of the Stoneman Douglas Shooting, by survivors of the Stoneman Douglas Shooting" using the hashtag #NeverAgain. The group has staged protests demanding legislative action to be taken to prevent similar shootings in the future and has vocally condemned U.S. lawmakers who have received political contributions from the National Rifle Association (NRA).

The group was founded by approximately twenty students who survived the Stoneman Douglas shooting. Wikipedia noted that "among its most prominent members are Cameron Kasky, Emma González, and David Hogg," but several other students were involved.

Who among these emerging student leaders of 2018 will continue onward as the guiding lights of this new political movement into the 2020s?

David Hogg, Alex Wind, Emma Gonzalez, Cameron Kasky, and Jaclyn Corin spoke to “Fox News Sunday” about the need for more discussion on gun control after 17 people were killed in February 14th’s deadly shooting.

Jaclyn Corin, Ryan Deitsch and Alfonso Calderon

Jaclyn Corin

Cameron Kasky and Jaclyn Corin

Cameron Kasky is a Junior at Stoneman Douglas High School. He was asked to write a piece for CNN, and appeared at the CNN town meeting, asking Senator Mario Rubio about his accepting money from the NRA.

Jaclyn Corin

Jaclyn Corin

Jaclyn Corin, 17, is the Stoneman Douglas High School Junior Class President.

Emma Gonzalez

Emma Gonzalez

Emma Gonzalez

Emma Gonzalez, 18, a senior, is a high-profile school activist, who survived the Parkland shooting. González was raised in Parkland, Florida. Her mother is a math tutor and her father, Jose González, is a cybersecurity attorney who immigrated from Cuba to New York City in 1968. In high school, González was the tracking team leader on Project Aquila, a mission to send a school-made weather balloon "to the edge of space"; the project was documented by fellow student David Hogg. She is one of the cofounders of Never Again MSD. On February 17, 2018, González gave an often-quoted and well-publicized 11-minute speech speech in front of the Broward County Courthouse at a gun control rally in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. González was attacked for her Fort Lauderdale speech by many from the political right wing. She has also faced derogatory and misinformed comments made by internet trolls about her sexual orientation, short hair, and skin color. Glamour Magazine called González "the face of the #NeverAgain movement" and "a recognizable icon."

Jaclyn Corin, Cameron Kasky, Emma Gonzalez

Emma Gonzalez, unknown, Alfonso Calderon, Delaney Tarr

Alfonso Calderon

Alfonso Calderon

Alfonso Calderon

Alfonso Calderon, 16, a junior, spent four hours in a closet during the Parkland shooting. He is one of the cofounders of the Never Again MSD movement.

Emma Gonzalez, David Hogg

Kelsey Friend, unknown, David Hogg

David Hogg, David's father

David Hogg

Kelsey Friend, David Hogg

David Miles Hogg, a senior and student journalist, is one of the cofounders of Never Again MSD. He is the son of Kevin Hogg, a Republican and former agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Rebecca Boldrick, a teacher for Broward County Public Schools in Broward County, Florida. As an FBI agent, Hogg's father worked at airports in Los Angeles and Florida before retiring from the bureau in October 2016 because he was diagnosed with early-onset Parkinson’s disease. He is a Teenlink reporter for the Sun Sentinel, and chose to attend Stoneman Douglas because of the television production classes it offered. David Hogg was a focus of alt.right conspiracy theories that he was a "crisis actor." Alex Jones' anti-Hogg videos were cited for "harassment and bullying" by YouTube and Facebook, and removed. Mario Rubio tweeted, "Claiming some of the students on tv after #Parkland are actors is the work of a disgusting group of idiots with no sense of decency."

Alex Wind

Alex Wind

Alex Wind

Alex Wind, 17, a junior, is a member of the school's drama club. Wind and his friend Cameron Kasky were founding members of the #NeverAgain movement. He sang the National Anthem at the Miami Heat's home game to honor the victims of the Parkland shooting.

Cameron Kasky

Cameron Kasky

Delaney Tarr, Cameron Kasky, Ryan Deitsch

Ryan Deitsch

 Ryan Deitsch, Jaclyn Corin, Lorenzo Prado

Lorenzo Prado

Lorenzo Prado, junior, who is a spokesperson now, was, the day of the shooting, mistaken for being the shooter. He said that because he was wearing similarly colored clothing and matched Cruz's description, SWAT team members descended upon him and drew their guns. He was tossed to the ground, held at gunpoint, and unjustly cuffed.
Ryan Deitsch

Ryan Deitsch, a student journalist and producer for the school newsroom, took multiple videos from a closet when the shooting began and in the school. He is the president and founder of the school's improv club. 

three Parkland shooting survivors

Carly Novell, Delaney Tarr

Carly Novell, a senior at the Florida high school where at 17 people were killed in a mass shooting Wednesday afternoon, survived by hiding in a closet with several of her classmates. It was an eerie parallel to a day almost 70 years earlier, when Novell’s grandfather, Charles Cohen, survived one of the nation’s earliest mass shootings by a lone gunman in 1949....When Cohen was 12 years old, he hid from notorious mass murderer Howard Unruh in Camden, New Jersey, as his parents and grandmother were killed in their home."Student Carly Novell Became the Second Member of Her Family to Survive a Mass Shooting," by Olivia Estrum, Mother Jones, February 15, 2018.

Carly Novell

Delaney Tarr

Delaney Tarr

Delaney Tarr, Jaclyn Corin

Delaney Tarr, a senior, took a broadcast production class during her freshman year and served as anchor of the school’s news broadcast during her junior year. As a student journalist, she was a post-Parkland shooting spokesperson who talked to the media and was responsible for an essay about the situation in Teen Vogue.

Samuel Zeif

Samuel Zeif

Samuel Zeif

Samuel Zeif, an 18-year-old senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, was invited to the White House meeting.

Unidentified students at the Florida State Capitol


The alt-right tries to connect the dots to undermine the student activists.

One of the less inspiring things about the movement led by student survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting has been the conspiracy theory—proliferated in the swampy depths where such things proliferate—that the students are actually “crisis actors.” It’s a warped brand of trutherism that spread after Sandy Hook and has since, as my colleague Eric Lach wrote this week, been impossible to reason with. But that isn’t to say that the kids aren’t actors. Cameron Kasky, the seventeen-year-old firebrand who started the Never Again movement with his classmates, told Wolf Blitzer, “Well, if you had seen me in our school’s production of ‘Fiddler on the Roof,’ you would know that nobody would pay me to act for anything.” ~ by Michael Shulman, "The Spring Awakening of the Stoneman Douglas Theatre Kids," The New Yorker, February 23, 2018.

Cameron Kasky, Delaney Tarr, Emma Gonzales, David Hogg

Cameron Kasky, Jaclyn Corin, Emma Gonzales

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Shooting - CBS Anti-Gun Squad - Who's Who

The Kids From Florida Aren’t Acting

The above Children's Crusade cartoon was revised by GunFreeZone to promote a now-incorrect conservative media account about allegedly scripts provided for students. It never happened but the cartoon lives on.

Misinformation has been used to attempt to discredit the student organizers and CNN, regarding the content of one town meeting.

Fox News, Politifact, and other outlets published a report on February 23, 2018 that CNN scripted questions for Colton Haab, a 17-year old Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps cadet. He withdrew from appearing on CNN. The dispute drew attention from President Donald Trump, who took to Twitter to pile on CNN, a news outlet he has long disparaged as "fake news." CNN refuted that story. CNN released documents demonstrating the Haab family doctored its email exchange with CNN to make the networks’ role appear more heavy-handed than it actually was. Glenn Haab, Colton’s father, has admitted to altering the emails to several news outlets.

See also here


Popular Culture Footnote

Avengers: The Children's Crusade, appeared via Marvel Comics,
first in June 2011, written by Allan Heinberg and illustrated by Jim Cheung.


Loren Coleman, MSW 1978, Simmons College, Boston, is the author of Suicide Clusters (1987) and The Copycat Effect (2004).