Thursday, November 27, 2014

Gateway Arch Bomb Plot

Hot on the heels of my essay, "Gateway Arch to Hell: Ferguson in Trident Times," the structure is in the news again. I posted that selection on November 24, 2014, immediately after the non-indictment decision, regarding the shooting of Michael Brown, was made. As widely predicted, demonstrations, fires, and rioting occurred in 130 cities.

On November 26, it was announced the new issue of The New Yorker would have a cover illustration (above) by Bob Staake that shows the Gateway Arch as a broken landmark, white and black, with a missing top section. It symbolizes the racial tension in St. Louis due to the Ferguson situation.

Observation deck location at the Gateway Arch, St. Louis. Photo credit.

Now comes word on November 27 (American Thanksgiving) - via an unsealed indictment - that a plot was sidetracked that would have caused a bomb to go off in exactly the above shown, missing section of the Gateway Arch.

Two St. Louis men ​plotted to bomb the Gateway Arch and murder the Ferguson police chief and prosecutor who handled Michael Brown’s case​. They had obtained one pipe bomb. They had plans to obtain two others.

Brandon Orlando Baldwin (also known as Brandon Muhammad - above) and Olajuwon Ali Davis (also known as Olajuwon Ali and Brother Ali) ​were allegedly ​planning to plant a bomb inside the observation deck of the ​iconic ​Arch, sources told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

A November 21st report of their arms-related arrest mentioned their links to the New Black Panther Party. They allegedly acquired two Hi-Point .45 ACP pistols for someone else, at Cabela’s hunting gear store​ in Hazelwood, Missouri.

​After that arrest, the plot to bomb the Gateway Arch was revealed, but whether they were going to use the explosive to kill St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch and Police Chief Tom Jackson is unknown.​

Davis/Ali describes himself as a "Moorish American," and a member of the Moorish Science Temple of America.

The New Black Panther Party issued a statement calling the allegations regarding bombing and killing "totally unfounded" and were "baseless and have no merit."

The links to "Little Egypt" and the area are recalled, of course, with these "Moorish" threads and Brandon Muhammad's fashion choices.

Intriguing that one of the bomb plotter's first name is Brandon. It is Jim Brandon who notes, in his The Rebirth of Pan: Hidden Faces of the American Earth Spirit (Dunlap, IL: Firebird Press, 1983), that the Gateway Arch location is across from the Cahokia Mounds complex. The Cahokia group includes the Monks Mound, the largest pyramid north of Mesoamerica. Its base circumference is larger than the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacan.

"Which naturally leads me to ask who, then, built the more than one hundred conical, ridgetop, and platform mounds that once stood here, plus several dozens more in outlying areas and across the Mississippi precisely where the Gateway Arch now stands?" writes Brandon.

Thanks for elements of the non-bomb data from AWG and BG.

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1 comment:

Cory Panshin said...

The Moorish Science Temple? That's a whole bunch of weird all in itself. From Wikipedia:

Drew reported that during his travels, he met with a high priest of Egyptian magic. In one version of Drew's biography, the leader saw him as a reincarnation of the founder, while in others, the priest considered Drew a reincarnation of Jesus, the Buddha, Muhammad and other religious prophets. According to the biography, the high priest trained Drew in mysticism and gave him a "lost section" of the Quran.

This text came to be known as the Holy Koran of the Moorish Science Temple of America (which is not to be confused with the Islamic Quran). It is also known as the "Circle Seven Koran" because of its cover, which features a red "7" surrounded by a blue circle. Drew took parts of his book from the Rosicrucian work, Unto Thee I Grant, and most of it from The Aquarian Gospel of Jesus the Christ, published in 1908 by esoteric Ohio preacher Levi Dowling. In The Aquarian Gospel, Dowling described Jesus's supposed travels in India, Egypt, and Palestine during the years of his life which are not accounted for by the New Testament. Drew and his followers used this material to claim, "Jesus and his followers were Asiatic." ("Asiatic" was the term Drew used for all dark or olive-colored people; he labeled all whites as European. He suggested that all Asiatics should be allied.) . . .

An increasing number of people claiming to follow Moorish Science have filed false legal documents in various municipalities around the United States. The documents include fake liens, deeds, and property claims. The Moorish Science Temple has disavowed any affiliation with those filing the false documents, calling them "radical and subversive fringe groups". Moorish Science has influenced or been connected to several other groups, including the Washitaw Nation and the Nuwaubian Nation.