Sunday, September 24, 2017

Antioch Again: Church Shooting 2017

There's been a church shooting in Antioch.

The shooter was wearing a clown mask, according to some, or a "a neoprene ski mask," in another report. A 911 caller said it was a "clown mask." Police said rumors the gunman was wearing a clown mask do not appear to be true; the mask was “more like what you would see on a skier.”





At least one person, a woman, was killed and seven others have been injured at Burnette Chapel Church of Christ shooting in Antioch, Tennessee. The shooter shot himself and is being treated at the hospital. Another person was pistol whipped and has been taken to the hospital.

All of the wounded have been taken to area hospitals, the fire department says. The majority are older adults. "All of the wounded except for one is over the age of 60," the Nashville Fire Department said.


The suspect, 25-year-old Emanuel Kidega Samson, immigrated from Sudan two decades ago, police said. He's suspected of bringing two pistols and a mask to the predominantly white Burnette Chapel Church of Christ in Antioch, southeast of Nashville, before opening fire just after 11 a.m.

The church, which has a weekly service at 10 a.m., is located at 3890 Pin Hook Road.

It is not clear what kind of mask he wore. All kinds of "neoprene" masks exist.









The shooting in Rockford, Washington State, on September 13, 2017, at the Freedom High School was allegedly done by Caleb Sharpe, who portrayed himself on Facebook as The Joker.

___

It will be recalled that church shootings left ten injured in one bloody weekend in July 2008, in Toronto and Tennessee. See here.
___

Antioch has come to the fore in past incidents.

On Monday, March 28, 2016, at about 2:39 p.m. ET, an armed man was fired upon by U.S. Capitol Police when he arrived at the Capitol Visitor Center carrying a weapon, which reportedly discharged, wounding one female bystander. That female civilian was injured by shrapnel. No U.S. Capitol Police officers were injured, despite early reports they were. The suspect has been identified as Larry Russell Dawson from Antioch, Tennessee, who called himself a pastor but who was identified at the time as a licensed funeral director and embalmer.

Antioch, Tennessee was the site of a predicted theater incident that occurred on August 5, 2015, exactly two weeks after a shooting at a showing of Trainwreck in Lafayette, Louisiana.

[Please recall that the Lafayette shooter shares the same middle name as the D.C. suspect. The Capitol gunmen is allegedly Larry Russell Dawson. Lafayette's was John Russell Houser. Origin of the name Russell is from the transferred use of the surname derived from the Old French roussell (red-haired), from rous (red). The name, which arose as a nickname for someone with red hair, or even "little red one," was brought to England by the Normans.]

The Antioch hatchet attack and air pistol shooting resulted in the death of the attacker, Vincente David Montano, and the injury of three patrons of the theater.

The 2015 event took place at the Carmike Hickory 8 Cinema in Antioch, Tennessee, around 1:15 p.m. The gunman at the Hickory Hollow Cinema, Montano was allegedly armed with a hatchet, pepper spray, an Airsoft gun, and a fake bomb. He reportedly was wearing a surgical mask. He was shot dead by a SWAT team as he exited through the theater's rear door. The Carmike Hickory 8 Cinema and Hickory Hollow Cinema are references to Andrew "Old Hickory" Jackson. See more here.

The movie playing at the Carmike Hickory 8 Cinema was Mad Max: Fury Road. The Dark Knight Rises' Bane (Tom Hardy) plays Mad Max's Max Rockatansky (Tom Hardy).


=====


Antioch is a community in southeast Nashville, Tennessee.

The community takes its name from Antioch, Turkey, an ancient city in Anatolia. As recently as the 1960s Antioch was a small community catering to the needs of area farmers with amenities such as a feed mill. Adjacent to Bakertown (a similar small community) it was located on the banks of Mill Creek, a minor tributary of the Cumberland River that rises near Nolensville, several miles to the southeast. This area has become less important over time as zoning restrictions forbidding further development on a floodplain have limited the construction of more businesses in this area, which had started to become congested.

Antioch on the Orontes was an ancient Greek city on the eastern side of the Orontes River. Its ruins lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey, and lends the modern city its name.

Founded near the end of the 4th century BC by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. This and more historical notes can be found via the summary on Wikipedia.

Especially noteworthy is that Seleucus founded Antioch on a site chosen through ritual means. An eagle, the bird of Zeus, had been given a piece of sacrificial meat and the city was founded on the site to which the eagle carried the offering. Seleucus did this on the 22nd day of the month of Artemisios in the twelfth year of his reign (equivalent to May 300 BC). Antioch soon rose above Seleucia Pieria to become the Syrian capital.

Agrippa and Tiberius enlarged the theatre, and Trajan finished their work. Antoninus Pius paved the great east to west artery with granite. A circus, other colonnades and great numbers of baths were built, and new aqueducts to supply them bore the names of Caesars, the finest being the work of Hadrian. The Roman client, King Herod (most likely the great builder Herod the Great), erected a long stoa on the east, and Agrippa (c.63 BC – 12 BC) encouraged the growth of a new suburb south of this.

The Greek hippodrome was the basic model for both the Roman stadium and the Roman circus. It will be recalled that the term "stadium seating" comes from the Ancient Greek "circuses" (like Antioch) and evolved into theater seating (like in modern movie theaters and sports stadiums).

Correspondent Travis Vaughn made the observation that in 256, Antioch was suddenly raided by the Persians, who slew many in the theatre.

Outside Antioch, Greece, on October 22, 362, a mysterious fire destroyed the Temple of Apollo at Daphne.

There have been other modern incidents of violence at Antiochs. See here.

1 comment:

Daniel Sale said...

The header he used for his Facebook page depicts someone kneeling.