Thursday, March 27, 2014

Mystery Flight 370 Ends in the Indian Ocean Vile Vortex

As I previously noted here and in the most popular posting I've written for this Twilight Language blog (with over 17,000 readers as of today), "Terrorism, Aliens, Vile Vortices: The Mysteries of Missing Flight 370," on March 9, 2014, I hinted where the focus of the search would end,

The Wharton Basin, especially its southern portions, is the key to this vile vortice. 

Ships and planes have not been the subject of study here but whirling rings of lights under the Indian Ocean.

Ivan T. Sanderson's Indian Ocean Vile Vortex.

Unlike the Bermuda Triangle and Japan's Dragon's Triangle or Devil's Sea, the area where Flight 370 appears to have vanished has no popular culture name.

Because of its location of several storied waves and terrible winds, locals call these seas just south of here the "Roaring Forties." But those seas may have distracted searchers for days.

The area of interest is known in Fortean literature as the Indian Ocean's vile vortex, labeled "Wharton Basin" on one map.

While it was plotted out to be a predicted area of vanishings by Sanderson and others, there is a clear explanation of why it was ignored.

"There would appear to be ten lozenges, or vortices, ringing our earth in two belts, one in the northern, and the other in the southern hemisphere. These are approximately, if not precisely, centered 72° apart, and those in the southern hemisphere all shifted to the East (or right) exactly the same distance to about 40°. All but two lie over water but there is no evidence for one in the southern Indian Ocean; probably because no ships or planes ever passed through or over it."
Ivan T. Sanderson, Invisible Residents, 1970, p. 143.

The Flight 370 search areas have moved around until now, when the focus is in the vile vortex of the southern Indian Ocean.

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