Wednesday, February 03, 2021

Capitol Insurrection Deaths, Suicides, and the Name Game

During the first day of the Impeachment Trial, February 9, 2021, the footage that was played showed a new realization and acknowledgement of the number of deaths associated with the Insurrection of January 6, 2021.

While the media had stayed with the number "five" (5), the footage presented a new counting.  That number still falls short of my count.


From the footage shown to Congress.



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Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick lies in honor at U.S. Capitol, on February 2-3, 2021.

Sicknick was killed during the attack on the Capitol.









During the "Capitol Insurrection" on January 6, 2021, we have heard of several individuals who were killed, died, or took their own lives. A hostile crowd or mob of mostly Caucasian individuals stormed and took control of the halls, offices, and floor of Congress at the Capitol. The Capitol Police were ill-prepared, under armed (if at all), and slow in received frequently requested backup. The head of the Capitol Police resigned soon afterwards.

Let's take a look of those who died during and in the wake of the storming of the Capitol.

The deaths resulting from and in the wake of the January 6, 2021 events include:



(1) Brian D. Sicknick, 42, a Capitol Police officer was a 15-year veteran of the force. He was mortally wounded by a rioter who hit him in the head with a fire extinguisher, although a new theory based on later investigations tied his death to "bear spray."


(2) Ashli Elizabeth Babbitt, a 35-year-old Air Force veteran from San Diego, was fatally shot by Capitol Police as she attempted to climb through a shattered window in a barricaded door leading into the Speaker's Lobby, which has direct access to the House floor.


(3) Rosanne Boyland, 34, of Kennesaw, Georgia, was trampled to death by people rushing to breach a tunnel entrance on the west side of the Capitol; she was a radicalized follower of QAnon whose family had begged her not to attend.

(4) Benjamin Philips, 50, of Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, died of a stroke. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that there was no indication that Philips participated in the raid. Philips had started the social media site "Trumparoo," intended for Trump supporters.

(5) Kevin Greeson, 55, from Athens, Alabama, Greeson had a heart attack outdoors on the Capitol grounds, and was declared dead at 2:05 p.m., shortly before the breach of the Capitol. Posts circulating on Twitter and Facebook claimed that Greeson suffered a heart attack after leaving a taser in his pants and accidentally triggering it when he was attempting to steal a portrait in the Capitol. This cause of death was investigated by USA Today, and declared "false."



(6) Christopher Stanton Georgia, 53, who was arrested for participating in the Capitol insurrection on January 6, 2021, has died by suicide, on January 9, 2021. The investment manager was found dead in his Alpharetta, Georgia home with a gunshot wound to his chest.


(7) Howard Charles Liebengood, known as Howie, 51, was an officer of the United States Capitol Police from April 2005 until his death by suicide at the age of 51, on January 9, 2021. Liebengood had been on duty during the storming of the United States Capitol three days before his death.


(8) Jeffery Smith, 35, had worked for the Metropolitan Police Department for 12 years and died by suicide on January 15, 2021,—just nine days after thousands of MAGA supporters stormed the Capitol. Smith had been one of the police officers who rushed to the scene.



(9) Ron Wright, 67, died February 7, 2021. Representative (R-Arlington, Texas). Republican Rep. Ron Wright of Texas died after contracting Covid-19.

The media keeps saying "5" died due to the Insurrection. I count a possible 9.


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[Strange timing?]



Dr. Harold N. Bornstein, 73, who for a time was President Donald J. Trump’s personal physician and who had attested that Mr. Trump would be “the healthiest individual ever elected to the presidency,” died on Friday, January 8, 2021. His death was announced on Thursday in a paid notice in The New York Times. The notice did not give a cause or say where he died.


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Details

Brian D. Sicknick



Capitol Police released a statement on Friday, January 8, 2021, saying Officer Brian D. Sicknick passed away Thursday night, January 7, 2021, "due to injuries sustained while on-duty." Sicknick was struck in the head with a fire extinguisher, returned to his office, and collapsed. He was taken to the hospital, and died the next day.




Sicknick was a Trump supporter, and an Iraqi vet. Sicknick was originally from South River, New Jersey, and the youngest of three sons, according to a statement issued by his brother on behalf of his family. Sicknick "wanted to be a police officer his entire life," his brother Ken said, and joined the New Jersey National Guard in his pursuit of that goal. According to a statement from New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy's office, Sicknick was a staff sergeant for the New Jersey National Guard. He served as a fire team member and a leader of the 108th Security Force Squadron, 108th Wing, at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, Murphy's statement said. Sicknick's service included two deployments -- one as part of Operation Southern Watch and another as part of Operation Enduring Freedom, Murphy said. Sicknick's family was "very proud" of his service to his country, Ken Sicknick said. 
"Brian is a hero, and that is what we would like people to remember," he said.
One of the hidden name games that seems constantly in battle for our attention, like the Fayette Factor (see here and here), is the moniker with roots in Nicholas.

Nicholas does have some intriguing connections:


Nicholas = English and Dutch: from the personal name (Greek Nikolaos, from nikān "to conquer" + laos "people"). Forms with -ch- are due to hypercorrection. The name in various vernacular forms was popular among Christians throughout Europe in the Middle Ages, largely as a result of the fame of a 4th-century Lycian bishop, about whom a large number of legends grew up, and who was venerated in the Orthodox Church as well as the Catholic. In English-speaking countries, this surname is also found as an Americanized form of various Greek surnames such as Papanikolaou "(son of) Nicholas the priest" and patronymics such as Nikolopoulos.Examining monikers, sometimes we find surprises. For instance, I discovered the name Nixon, which is an English baby name, is part of this name nexus. The meaning of the name Nixon is, literally, an abbreviation of Nicholas.


Nike (Winged Victory), Louvre, Paris, France.
The mythological Nike was a Greek goddess of victory and root origin of Nicholas. The Roman equivalent was Victoria. Depending upon the time of various myths, she was described as the daughter of the Titan Pallas and the goddess Styx, and the sister of Kratos (Strength), Bia (Force), and Zelus (Zeal).

Names stemming from Nike include among others: Nikolaos, Nicholas, Nicola, Nick, Nicolai, Niccolò, Nikolai, Nicolae, Nils, Klaas, Nicole, Ike, Niki, Nikita, Nika, Nieke, Naike, Niketas, Nikki, Nico, and Veronica.




Ashli Elizabeth Babbitt
















Air Force veteran fatally shot by police.
A woman was fatally shot by a US Capitol Police employee as the mob tried to force its way toward the House Chamber where members of Congress were sheltering, US Capitol Police said in a statement.
The woman was given medical assistance immediately and taken to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead.
Authorities identified her as Ashli Babbitt, a 35-year-old from Huntington, Maryland.
Babbit's mother, Michelle Witthoeft told CNN on Thursday she was devastated to learn of her daughter's death.
"I loved and admired her greatly," Witthoeft said of Babbitt. "She served this country boldly and proudly."
Babbitt was an ardent Trump supporter who held strong political views, her mother said, and was "passionate enough to die for what she believed in."
Babbitt, who was previously married but separated from her husband in 2019, frequently attended pro-Trump rallies. She flew to Washington, DC, from San Diego, California, with the intent to participate in the protest this week, her mother said.
"Her political views were strong and adamant, and she voiced them whenever she could," Witthoeft said.




Rosanne Boyland









Benjamin Philips

Philips created Trumparoo.


Kevin Greeson




False:


Harold N. Bornstein




Harold Nelson Bornstein (March 26, 1947 – January 8, 2021) was an American gastroenterologist, who was best known as Donald Trump's personal physician. Bornstein was Donald Trump's personal physician from 1980 until early 2018; before then Bornstein's father was his personal physician.
Bornstein received his M.D. degree from Tufts University in 1975 and had been licensed to practice medicine in New York State since 1976. He was certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine as a specialist in Internal Medicine (1978) and Gastroenterology (1983).


Christopher Stanton Georgia



53-year-old Christopher Stanton Georgia of Alpharetta, Ga., who was arrested last week in connection with the storming of the Capitol, was found dead in his home from a gunshot wound to the chest on January 9, 2021.


Howard Charles Liebengood




Officer Liebengood worked in the Senate Division and was the son of the late Sergeant at Arms Howard S. Liebengood. “Every Capitol Police Officer puts the security of others before their own safety and Officer Liebengood was an example of the selfless service that is the hallmark of the USCP,” Gus Papathanasiou, the chair of the Capitol Police Labor Committee, said in a statement after Liebengood’s death. “This is a tragic day.”

Former Sen. John Kerry remembered Liebengood on Twitter, saying the officer used to guard a door near his office on the Hill. “Howie always had a smile on his face, but he also showed great care for the safety of the young staff who worked behind our office doors,” Kerry wrote.

The officer's father was Howard Scholer Liebengood (December 29, 1942 – January 13, 2005), an American lawyer and lobbyist. A protégé of Senator Howard Baker, he served as Sergeant at Arms of the United States Senate from 1981 to 1983 before leaving to become a lobbyist for the Tobacco Institute. He later served as chief of staff to Senators Fred Thompson and Bill Frist.



Jeffery Smith





A second police officer who responded to the riots at the Capitol earlier this month has died by suicide, the D.C. police chief revealed. Jeffery Smith had worked for the Metropolitan Police Department for 12 years and died on Jan. 15—just nine days after thousands of MAGA supporters stormed the Capitol.

“Officer Jeffrey Smith’s service and presence will be dearly missed at the Second District,” MPD Second District Commander Duncan Bedlion told The Daily Beast in an email. “My prayers are with his family during a very difficult time.”

Smith is the second police officer to die by suicide after working at the Capitol on the day of the siege. U.S. Capitol Police Officer Howard Liebengood, a 51-year-old who had guarded the government building since 2005, took his own life on Jan. 9.

“My prayers are with the family and colleagues of Officer Jeffery Smith,” California Rep. Ted Lieu (D) wrote on Twitter Wednesday.

Ron Wright

"Congressman Ron Wright passed away peacefully at the age of 67 on Feb. 7, 2021. His wife Susan was by his side and he is now in the presence of their Lord and Savior," his office's statement read. "For the previous two weeks, Ron and Susan had been admitted to Baylor Hospital in Dallas after contracting COVID-19."










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The Memes were widespread. The FBI wanted posters were too.



















The White House was burned by the British on August 24, 1814.

















1 comment:

Nick Seetin said...

Interesting Loren. I have some thoughts as an archaeologist of Greece/ancient historian AND a person named Nick: The sense of the name is usually construed as "victory of the common people." Laos almost always signifies non-elites. This can be used insultingly by elite authors (like "rabble" or "mob") or proudly by supporters of democracy or revolution. The use of the term goes all the way back to Homer where the rank and file, who are almost entirely in the background of the poems (especially apparent in the Iliad) are called `o laos, to differentiate them from Achilles and Odysseus and Agamemnon, etc. who are the chieftains/leaders (`oi basileis, usually translated as "the kings"). Another name nearly identical in meaning is Nicodemus, (NIKO "victory" DEMOS "common people"). I haven't done any in depth research on this but I assume names like this became popular and spread throughout the Greek speaking world during the period when Athenian sea power was at its height in the 5th century BC under their so-called radical democracy. Their imperial ambitions had them promoting democracy, even forcing it on their subjects in a cultural and political rivalry with oligarchical Sparta.